Difference between revisions of "Bacillus cereus"

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==Differential Diagnosis==
 
==Differential Diagnosis==
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==Management==
 
==Management==

Revision as of 12:49, 4 August 2015

Background

  • Gram-positive, beta-hemolytic, rod-shaped bacterium
  • Known for causing foodborne illness in humans, though some strains are probiotic
  • Classically associated with "fried rice syndrome"
  • 8-16 hour incubation time

Pathogenesis

  • The emetic form is commonly caused by rice cooked for a time and temperature insufficient to kill any spores present, then improperly refrigerated. It can produce a toxin which is not inactivated by later reheating. This form leads to nausea and vomiting one to five hours after consumption. It can be difficult to distinguish from other short-term bacterial foodborne intoxications such as by Staphylococcus aureus.
  • Bacillus foodborne illnesses occur due to survival of endospores when food is improperly cooked. Bacterial growth results in production of enterotoxins, one of which is heat- and acid-stable (pH 2 to 11); ingestion leads to two types of illness: diarrheal and emetic.

Clinical Features

Differential Diagnosis

Acute diarrhea

Infectious

Noninfectious

Watery Diarrhea

Traveler's Diarrhea

Management

Prognosis

Most emetic patients recover within six to 24 hours but in some cases, the toxin can be fatal.[3]

See Also

References

  1. Kotiranta A, Lounatmaa K, Haapasalo M (2000). "Epidemiology and pathogenesis of Bacillus cereus infections". Microbes Infect 2 (2): 189–98. doi:10.1016/S1286-4579(00)00269-0. PMID 10742691.
  2. Marx et al. “Cholera and Gastroenteritis caused by Noncholera Vibrio Species”. Rosen’s Emergency Medicine 8th edition vol 1 pg 1245-1246.
  3. Takabe F, Oya M (1976). "An autopsy case of food poisoning associated with Bacillus cereus". ForensicSci 7 (2): 97–101.